Conservatory of Performing Arts

2013 Alumna Heidi Schlegel Worked as a Unit Production Manager on "The Chair"

Tuesday, December 02, 2014
In the video above, alumna Heidi Schlegel provides a behind-the-scenes look at her role as the unit production manager.

Heidi Schlegel

Meet Heidi Schlegel

Job title: Unit Production Manager, "The Chair" project (worked on Shane Dawson's film)
Degree earned: B.A. in Cinema Arts, 2013
Hometown: Denver, Pa.
High School: Cocalico High School

Describe your role working on “The Chair.”

I was the production manager, so I was in charge of overseeing the day-to-day operations that unfolded with the production. I hired the crew, facilitated meetings, coordinated schedules and made sure everything stayed on schedule.

What was it like working professionally on this project with Point Park?

Point Park has been a really good resource for me. I have reached out to a couple of mentors when I’ve had questions, and they've given me advice and guided me, giving me a little bit more confidence when doing my job.

How did you become involved?

I heard about the project from Nelson Chipman, who recommended me for the production manager position. I had an interview with Chris Moore, the executive producer of the project, and I guess he liked me.

"I chose Point Park because it was the only school in my price range that also allowed me to get my hands on a camera my first year."

- Heidi Schlegel


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Aside from this experience, what other projects have you worked on since you graduated?

I have been very busy. I worked on a television pilot called “Scientastic,” a kid’s television show for PBS. I also worked as a talent coordinator with “Dance Moms,” and I have done some freelance projects. Commercials were big during the summer. I was the production coordinator for a UPMC commercial and a Giant Eagle commercial. I have been lucky enough to go from one project to the next with only a couple of days between jobs.

Why did you choose to attend Point Park?

I chose Point Park because it was the only school in my price range that also allowed me to get my hands on a camera my first year. A lot of other well-known universities don’t let you touch a camera until your junior year, and I think that’s a bad way to learn. You have to dive right into it in order to decide if this is something you really want to do.

What advice do you have for prospective students?

The biggest advice I can give is to be as involved as possible. The main reason I have been able to get so much work is because I was able to network. I got to know an extensive amount of people who I went back to after I graduated. They knew how involved I was in school, knew my work ethic and some were able to give me a job right out of school. Internships, working on other student films and working on projects that aren’t student films are all very important. Working with professionals is the best way to secure a job after graduating.

Text by alumna Abigail Mathieu

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